The Immediacy of Fashion: Fashion Week Fever

Posted By: Rachel Iwaniec

Today, via editors’ instagram posts and blogger tweets we are front row at Fashion Week and within minutes, we are nit-picking every look from the collection on our favorite sites like style.com.

                                                

While fashion designers produce four to five collections a year, large chains such as Zara flaunt new deliveries every two weeks.  The fast-moving pace of manufacturing markets are stripping product delivery cycles from three months to as little as five weeks.  Subsequently, Zara consumers are able to nab a knock-off of the original prototype unveiled during Fashion Month. Not only are we, as spectator, given access to the fashion shows from New York, London, Milan, Paris and even Rio and Berlin, we are inundated with fashion copy-cats when brands are only in the market stage of the buying cycle.  Basically, we are being spoon-fed, sometimes almost identical replicas of products, which haven’t even gone into production.

But here’s the question: Do we want the phonies or the real thing?  While the price is right at places like H&M and Mango, the quality and expiration date are limited. Obsolete inventory is congesting the market with what feels like a singular note.  One trend is identified and is plucked and pulled until it no longer looks like its predecessor. However, there is a way to save the creative designer and it’s all about sitting on your hands.  It’s about the excitement of finally being introduced to those floral, flowing, heavenly pants and the Ode-to-the-90s flannel shirt that Dries Van Notten delightfully and deliberately put together:

It’s about falling in love with the cyber version and finally coming in contact with the 3D version.

What I’m trying to say is that we need to take a step back and try to remember why fashion is such a unique industry and why it is so enticing.  Garments need to be imbued with meaning and value again.  Rather than just popping into a store and purchasing an item without weighing its necessity, it should be viewed as an investment.  Fashion is going to “keep on keepin on” no matter what we do, but you have the choice to pick the Picassos of the global industry or the counterfeits.